Larotrectinib Displays Tolerability in Thyroid Cancer and Other Solid Tumors

Theodore W. Laetsch, MD, attending physician at the Cancer Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses the safety profile of larotrectinib in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

Theodore W. Laetsch, MD, an attending physician at the Cancer Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses the safety profile of larotrectinib (Vitrakvi) in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

According to Laetsch, larotrectinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TRK), is associated with certain neurological toxicities such as fatigue and dizziness. This is common with this class of agents associated with TRK inhibition. If therapy is discontinued, pain may persist for several days at the time of withdrawal, Laetsch said.

Slight elevations in liver function tests may occur in pediatric patients. In addition, mild cytopenias, most commonly neutropenia, are also associated with the agent.

0:08 | Larotrectinib is a TRK inhibitor. And so, some of the side effects that we see are part of this class of drugs and related to TRK inhibition, and those include some neurological side effects like fatigue and dizziness. We will also occasionally see patients when we stop this therapy will have some pain at the time of withdrawal which can last for several days but this is due to inhibition of the TRK receptor. Some patients will become dizzy. We see some potential off-target effects, meaning they are not clearly related to TRK receptor inhibition. In children, the most common of these are mild elevations in liver function tests and mild cytopenias, most commonly neutropenia.

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